THE RKGBLOG

The ad spend share situation by engine is essentially unchanged since last month.

“In social networks, on the other hand, users show up to find friends; ads are, at best, irrelevant to that goal.” Byran Urstadt, Tech Review

Looking at our agency’s client base in aggregate, last month Google received 79% of our clients’ ad dollars. Yahoo received 17%. Microsoft received 5%.

“But one thing that struck me is that I just found out today that the way AdSense works is we don’t actually know how much of a cut we’re getting. We just take their ads and run them on our site and they send us a check at the end of the month, and we trust them to give us a fair amount of whatever they were paid, though there’s no actual way to determine what a fair amount might be.” – FJY

Last week Google and Yahoo announced an agreement by which Yahoo would be allowed to selectively serve Google ads along side search results on Yahoo.com and Yahoo’s partner sites, and take advantage of Google’s Content ad platform as well.

May 2008 search engine share results aggregated across RKG clients: steady, no big change. Google at 81%.

Microsoft will offer cash back to users who make purchases after using Live search. IMHO, you can’t buy user loyalty.

For the first time, Google nudges Yahoo out of the top spot as most popular US site.

Looking at Q1 numbers for our client base, Google continues to gain paid search market share.

Providing searchers what they really want also gets retailers what they really want: more sales.

March was another month where, in aggregate, Google took another tiny slice of the pie away from Yahoo.

Here’s a video from Steve Souder speaking about site speed at Google in November.

I recorded my NEMOA presentation and posted video.

Tim Armstrong on the DoubleClick deal: “We are focused on uniting search and display online metrics and on improving the measurement and execution of media campaigns.”

Across our clients, from January 2008 to February 2008, Google picked up 2.3 points of ad spend share. Across our clients, comparing February 2008 to February 2007, we did not observe evidence of an advertising or sales slow-down.

Danny Sullivan, SearchEngineLand’s illustrious Editor-In-Chief, emailed me some follow-up questions about how we buy clicks and how we allocate budgets.

Matchtypes and negatives play key roles in keeping your ads away from less relevant search queries.

Here are our January 2008 PPC search engine share numbers.

I wish Yahoo and Microsoft all the best. But combining two organizations with serious problems in search wouldn’t yield one strong organization.

Yahoo open-sources some truly amazing code, such as YUI.

Amusing: hacking Google analytics via Yahoo pipes.

In October, across our clients, Google picked up 3 points of ad spend share, reaching 79% share. Google’s gain came at Yahoo’s expense: Yahoo’s share fell from 19% in September to 16% in October. Microsoft held steady in distant third, maintaining a 5% share.

Paid search market share held relatively stable in September, with Yahoo picking up one point of share from Google.

During July and August, across our client base, Google picked up four points of paid search market share, mostly at Yahoo’s expense.

Yahoo squeaks ahead of Google in the American Consumer Satisfaction Index.